Sweden Imports Trash, Heats Nation

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The U.S. produces over 220 million tons of waste each year—55 percent of which ends up in landfills, 33 percent gets recycled and 12.5 percent is incinerated. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, 65 percent of the waste generated by the U.S. in 2006 came from residences and 35 percent came from commercial and institutional sites. How can the U.S. implement an effective waste management system?

Sweden has an innovative waste management system in which the energy created by burnable waste is used to provide heat and electricity for the entire country. The heat produced by waste plants has become a substitute for fossil fuel.

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By Silvia Gutierrez, GMC Editor

You’re Hot Then You’re Cold: A Perfect Utensil for Any Meal or Drink

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With Earth Day right around the corner, Green Media Creations celebrates the countless recycling and sustainability efforts that are being made all around the world. For instance, the possibility for the extreme decrease in plastic cutlery and plastic truly is amazing.

Although revolutionary alternative-to-plastic products reflect how far we’ve come in this field, the statistics are still overwhelming. In the U.S. alone, 40 billion plastic utensils per year are thrown away after just one use. Narayana Peesapaty, founder of Bakeys and creator of edible spoons, compares 40 billion plastic utensils to India’s 120 billion plastic utensils thrown out per year.

Bakeys, which operates on fair trade principals, manufactures Peesapaty’s brilliant product in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. These edible spoons come in plain, savory and sweet flavors. They are made from rice, millet and wheat. With a shelf life of three years, these edible spoons are a truly creative alternative to plastic cutlery. If not consumed with a meal, they simply decompose within four to five days.

Peesapaty began this project with Kickstarter, which has received funding of well over his $20,000 goal. With over $150,000 in funds to work with, thus far, this project has quickly become a game changer. Peesapaty plans to use this money to expand this venture and create forks and chopsticks. He also hopes to start an international distribution system, which would ultimately reduce product and production costs.

With the current recipe, Bakeys’ edible spoons are already vegan and do not contain preservatives or trans fat. In the future, Bakeys hopes to achieve the following certifications: vegan, gluten-free, no high-fructose corn syrup, no preservatives, no trans fat, dairy-free, fair trade, organic, non-GMO and kosher.

Plastic takes hundreds of years to fully biodegrade, which leaves us with a pressing question: why has it taken us so long to find an alternative to plastics? Nonetheless, Bakeys edible spoons are a cutlery revolution and truly exemplify a step forward in sustainability efforts.

By Kimberly Dallmann, GMC Writer